Wednesday, April 29, 2015

SOA & BPM Partner Community Webcast May 8th 16:00 CET

Save the date for the Webcast below - make sure to attend, if you don't want to miss SOA & BPM news.

SOA & BPM Partner Community Webcast May 8th 16:00 CET

Join us for our monthly SOA & BPM Partner Community Webcast. We will give you an update on our SOA Suite 12c, Integration Cloud Service offerings and our community activities.



Speakers:
Vikas Anand
J├╝rgen Kress

Schedule: May 8th 2014 16:00-16:45 CET (Berlin time)

Attendance Information:
Join Webcast or dial in Call ID: 4070776 and Call Passcode: 333111

Austria: +43 (0) 192 865 12
Belgium: +32 (0) 240 105 28
Denmark: +45 327 292 22
Finland: +358 (0) 923 193 923
France: +33 (0) 15760 2222
Germany: +49 (0) 692 222 161 06
Ireland: +353 (0) 124 756 50

Italy: +39 (0) 236 008 198
Netherlands: +31 (0) 207 143 543
Spain: +34 914 143 755
Sweden: +46 (0) 856 619 465
Switzerland: +41 (0) 445 804 003
UK: +44 (0) 208 118 1001
United States: 140 877 440 73
More Local Numbers 
Watch and listen
You can join the Conference by clicking on the link: Join Webcast  (audio will play over your computer speakers or headset). Visit our SOA Partner Community Technology Webcast series here.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

WebSocket Integration with ADF for PPR Request Monitoring

WebSocket is a protocol enabling communication over TCP connection. Communication is interactive, meaning data can be sent both ways - from the server to the Web client and back. Data is sent through WebSocket channel, without using using regular HTTP. This means we can enable communication between server and Web client without consuming bandwidth from HTTP. WebLogic 12c is shipped with required libraries for WebSocket support, we can use this protocol straight away in ADF 12c. WebSocket supports JSON format, this allows to send and receive JSON formatted data, just the same as REST. In this post I'm going to describe how WebSocket could be used, to report PPR request time measured on the Web client (Monitoring PPR Request Time on ADF UI Client Side), back to the server.

JDeveloper 12c allows to create WebSocket project, this can be done in the existing ADF Fusion Web application:


Required libraries are not added automatically, developer needs to add them manually. If you are going to compile sample application for this post - make sure to set correct path for JSON library, otherwise project will fail compilation:


Below you can see example of server side WebSocket code. Class is annotated with ServerEndpoint path and contains various methods to listen for WebSocket events. One of the methods - processMessage with annotation OnMessage, this method is invoked when message from the Web client is received. I'm just printing out PPR request time measured on the client and sent through WebSocket channel:


WebSocket is using JSON format for the data message. Data structure must be defined by the POJO class:


In order to be able to use this structure with WebSocket, helper classes for encoding and decoding must be defined. Here is the example for encoder, it converts data structure to JSON String:


Decoder converts data back from JSON String to the data structure defined by POJO class:


Encoder/decoder is defined in WebSocket class annotation:


Let's see what is required to be implemented on the Web client side. Here we have simple Java Script code, where WebSocket connection is established - connection between Web client (browser) and server:


WebSocket connection is opened on main page load, by invoking Java Script method from clientListener:


Java Script function responsible for monitoring, sends measured PPR request time back to the server through WebSocket connection. See details in the sample application developed for this post:


This is how it works on runtime - user invokes PPR request, by pressing a button:


Server receives a message with information about PPR request time measured on the client. This message is received through the WebSocket, without using any bandwidth from HTTP channel. See printed message below:


Make sure to compile WebSocket project, before you run sample application.


Download sample application here - ADFAltaApp_v4.zip.

Friday, April 17, 2015

Monitoring PPR Request Time on ADF UI Client Side

We can measure how long it takes to process request on the server side, however it is equally important to measure how long PPR request takes on the client side. Mainly because this will be a key factor for application performance exposed to the end user. There is relatively easy approach in JSF 2.0 to measure PPR request time on client side - with a special ajax tag. ADF 11g R2 and ADF 12c are based on JSF 2.0, this means we can use such tag and measure request performance. Read in my previous post how to monitor page load time in ADF UI client - Monitoring Page Load Time on ADF UI Client Side.

Here is the example of ajax tag. It provides special property called onevent, this property points to custom JavaScript method, which will be invoked by the framework when PPR request starts and ends:


Ajax tag can be used for various ADF UI components, initiating request. Below you can see example of ADF Faces button configured with onevent monitoring, it points to custom JavaScript monitor method:


JavaScript monitor method is invoked automatically, when request starts and succeeds. This means we can get start and end time, calculate total time taken to process PPR request from click to rendered response:


I would like to emphasise importance of this approach, based on example of ADF TF opening. Task Flow is a server side concept, on runtime its all is converted to HTML and rendered in the browser. When user clicks on the button, to render ADF TF content, he waits until it is initialised on the server side, business logic is executed and finally response is rendered. My example contains Method Call activity with delay code intentionally, to demonstrate how PPR request time measurement works:


ExecuteDelay method call invokes Java method, where thread is paused for 5 seconds:


Let's see how it works on runtime. Home page contains a list of employees, there is team hierarchy link available for each employee. On user click, it loads ADF TF with Hierarchy viewer (ADF TF explained above, with thread delay):


PPR request time starts when user clicks on the link and ends when ADF TF UI fragment content is rendered. This gets close to 6 seconds (there is added 5 seconds delay time from TF method call). We can measure, how long it really takes to see the content for the user, starting from the first click:


As soon as PPR request is completed, Hierarchy viewer component renders team structure:


Navigation back to the list is measured as well, it takes below 1 second:


PPR requests time for Save/Cancel/Back buttons in edit screen is measured in the same way:


Download sample application with implementation of described approach - ADFAltaApp_v3.zip.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Monitoring Page Load Time on ADF UI Client Side

In certain situations, it might be useful to monitor ADF page load time. This is pretty easy to achieve with Navigation Timing API and Java Script. Navigation Timing API is supported by modern browsers and allows to retrieve client side load time. It takes into account data transfer time and actual rendering in the browser - real time it took for a user to see the content.

We could use ADF clientListener operation with load type, to identify when ADF UI is loaded. This listener should be added to the ADF UI document tag and it will be invoked at the end of page rendering. Through clientListener, we could invoke our custom JavaScript method, where we could calculate page load time on ADF UI client side:


The most important thing here, is to get page load start time. This value is retrieved from Navigation Timing API (mentioned above) - performance.timing.navigationStart. The rest is easy - we can get load time:


This is how it looks like on runtime. When I recompile ADF application and redeploy it on the server, first load is obviously slower. ADF UI is rendered on the client side (starting from page load request) in 10 seconds (look at top right corner):


Second access is a way faster - page load on the client side happens in 1 second:


You can test it yourself, download sample application (redsam/welcome1) - ADFAltaApp_v2.zip.

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Simple (Effective) Refresh Approach for ADF Regions

I often hear developer asking about how to refresh different regions on the same page, when specific event happens in one of the regions - to refresh dependent regions. Usually developers would like to use something more simple than Contextual Event approach. There is more simple approach, may be it doesn't work for all the possible use cases - but it does it job, when just refresh is needed. This approach is based on dummy parameter value, being used as dependent region input parameter, with refresh option set to be ifNeeded.

For the sample test case, I'm using ADF 12c application (SimpleReloadRegionApp.zip). This application contains two AM's, to simulate two Data Controls to be used in separate regions:


Fragment from the first region, generates refresh event, when Save button is pressed. For this purpose, I have registered Property Listener to update flag variable. This variable value is initialised from refreshToken method, available in RefreshHelperBean:


Bean method is very simple, it takes current timestamp value and returns it to String. This value always will be changed and this ensures dependent region refresh:


Make sure to set input parameter for the region TF you want to refresh, this should be simple parameter of type String:


TF must call Execute operation, this will force to reload VO rowset data, before loading the fragment:


In the main page, where region is consumed, change refresh condition to ifNeeded and set refreshFlag parameter to point to the variable initialized in the first region (by property listener):


There are two regions rendered on the UI. Once I change data in the top region (form component) and press Save, second region below is refresh automatically and it fetches latest available data from DB:

Friday, April 3, 2015

Indicator for Background REST Service Access with A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator

You should check my previous post about Background REST Service Access with A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator (AMPA). There I describe how to optimise MAF performance for REST service calls, allow user to continue working with the mobile application, without locking the screen until Web Service response arrives. Steven Davelaar have documented how it works, you can read it in his blog - Calling Web Services in Background Using MAF 2.1.

I have updated sample application from previous post, to include indicator for AMPA background service call status tracking. Updated sample application - MobileServiceBusApp_v8.zip.

AMPA provides application scope variable, which acts as a flag and indicates when background service call is executed. Based on this flag, we could conditionally display animated GIF image, this will help user to understand if background service call still runs:


When user is searching and request is being processed in background, he will see rotating status indicator in the top right corner:


Until data is being returned from background task, user could go to another screen and monitor when request is completed, to see the latest data:


Once background task completes, indicator disappears:

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Automatic ADF Popup Opening on Fragment Load

I had a post about opening ADF Popup on page load - Opening ADF PopUp on Page Load. Approach is quite straightforward, developer needs to use showPopupBehavior operation with appropriate trigger type. When it comes to ADF Popup opening on fragment load, implementation is a bit more complex. There is a known method to implement hidden text field and in the getter method call your custom logic - getter will be executed when fragment loads. However, this is not very efficient, you will need to add condition to distinguish between first and subsequent calls to the getter (it will be executed multiple times). I will describe in this post different approach - using ADF poll component and forcing it to execute only once after fragment load.

Here you can download sample application - FragmentPopUpLoadApp.zip. This sample implements two UI tabs. Each of the tabs renders ADF region. First region displays information about all employees - tree map with salary information:


Automatic popup opening is implemented in the second region - Employees By Department tab. As soon as user opens this tab, popup is load to select department. Data in the region is filtered, based on department selected in the popup:


Filtered data after selection was made in automatically opened popup:


Popup in the fragment is loaded on the first load by ADF poll component. Poll component is set with short interval of 10 milliseconds. During its first execution it will call Java listener method and in addition JavaScript client listener will be invoked. Inside JavaScript client listener, we disable ADF poll component by setting its interval to be negative. This is how ADF poll executes only once and then it stops:


Here is Java listener method, invoked by ADF poll component - it loads the popup:


ADF poll is stopped after its first execution. However, we need to ensure it will be started again - if user re-opens the same tab. For this purpose I have implemented conditional ADF region activation - region is de-activated when user navigates away from the tab. Tab disclosure listener updates helper variable to track which tab becomes active:


Disclosure listener updates page flow scope variable - forceActivate:


This variable is used in the region definition - region is active when tab is selected, and inactive otherwise: